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What is Bloomsday?

Sean Latham, Director of the Oklahoma Center for the Humanities, explains the June 16th literary holiday known as Bloomsday. The epic novel Ulysses by James Joyce has been banned, praised, criticized and idolized. Considered one of the greatest books ever... MORE

Mark Twain Quote - Secret Source of humor is not joy, but sorrow; there is no humor in heaven.

Humor and Pain

In our latest report from the humanities research seminar on humor, David Blakely explore the surprising connections between laughter and suffering. I recently saw an evening of stand-up comedy. One young comic, a lanky youth with hands like nervous birds, told roundabout... MORE

Humor and Mental Illness

Here’s another report from the Humanities Research Seminar on the topic of humor.  In this installment, Kim Ivey, a graduate student in Anthropology, considers the ways in which humor might be used to help better understand and event treat mental... MORE

Humor and Assimilation in Vaudeville

Our latest report from the Humanities Research Seminar comes from Machele Miller Dill, Director of the Musical Theatre Program at TU.  Here she considers the way vaudeville helped explore the rapidly changing shape of American culture in the early twentieth century. I... MORE

Satire, Friendship, and Masculinity

Our reports from the Humanities Research Seminar continue.  Here, Dayne Riley, a doctoral student in English, reflects on the role of satire in eighteenth-century Britain. For the famed satirical poets of Augustan Britain (1700-1745), humor and friendship mixed to create... MORE

Humor and the Everyday

This week we continue our series of reports from the Humanities Research Seminar on the topic of humor.  Here, TU student Tracy Kinealy explores contemporary television shows that seek to transform the everyday into something funny and use funny things... MORE

Humor or Nonsense? by Professor Holly Laird

Our regular series of posts by the Humanities Research Fellows continues.  Here, O’Hornett Professor of English, Holly Laird uses Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear to reflect on the relationship between humor and nonsense.